Art

The Lower School visual arts program is designed to help students develop capabilities for creating, understanding, and appreciating symbols and images – in short, visual literacy. Students participate in a wide range of activities to encourage and expand creative expression, to broaden their understanding of the arts in a historical and cultural context, and to begin developing a personal sense of aesthetics.

Students explore a variety of arts materials through both teacher-directed activities and individual experimentation. Sequential instruction in drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, and printmaking forms the core of materials-based learning. Students are encouraged to value the art-making process.Sincere effort and a spirit of exploration are valued more than specific product outcomes.

Children become familiar with world cultures, individual artists, and stylistic movements in concert with their own exploration of art materials and techniques. This helps demonstrate art’s vital connection with a myriad of other aspects of society. Cultural and historical content is selected to represent a wide range of aesthetic belief and practice and to provide thematic connection with other academic areas, as well as in response to student interest.

Students are encouraged to observe and respond to all aspects of the visual world, sharing thoughts, forming opinions, and participating in discussions. They make significant personal and aesthetic decisions regarding their artwork and then reflect on and evaluate the results of these choices. In other words, in moving from personal experience to an examination of widely held principles and practices, students begin to develop an individual sense of style and aesthetics.

Art - Early Childhood

The major goals for early childhood students in Art are to:

Creative Expression

  • draw with pencil, crayon, marker, and cray-pas
  • draw a face, including eyes, nose, mouth, hair, and ears
  • paint with tempera, watercolor, and finger-paint, demonstrating a variety of marks
  • use different-sized brushes
  • paint on various sizes and shapes of paper; paint on 3D surfaces
  • identify the primary and secondary colors by name
  • experiment with mixing primary colors to discover secondaries
  • begin to explore the concept of uniting small parts to form a larger whole
  • work with 3D materials, including pottery clay
  • create stamp prints with man-made and natural objects
  • create monoprints
Aesthetics

  • describe own work
  • look carefully to notice detail
Cultural Heritage

  • know that all people create art differently
  • know that art is made from many different material

Art - Kindergarten & Grade 1

The major goals for kindergarten and first-grade students in Art are to:

Creative Expression

  • combine shapes and lines to draw recognizable images with a variety of drawing media
  • draw a self portrait including primary facial features and demonstrating individual hair and eye color
  • depict size relationships among people
  • draw a familiar object from memory
  • use and understand the individual properties of tempera and watercolor
  • thoughtfully utilize all space available on page
  • know how to mix secondary colors from primaries
  • use a palette for mixing tempera
  • understand that sculpture can be made from many different materials
  • create a simple papier-mache sculpture
  • make a sculpture or container from pottery clay
  • incise an image on a Styrofoam printing plate to create a relief print
Aesthetics


  • describe a few specific things student likes in the art work of others
  • describe objects in terms of color, texture, shape, size, and detail
  • know that art work can express intangibles such as feelings
Cultural Heritage

  • recognize common subjects, styles, and techniques of the arts from different cultures or ethnic groups
  • create original works that integrate characteristics from different cultures, including the student's own community

Art - Grades 2-3

The major goals for second- and third-grade students in Art are to:

Creative Expression

  • select most appropriate drawing material based on project requirements and/or personal preference
  • draw a self portrait which depicts individual eye, hair, and skin color, as well as descriptive details
  • draw from memory, imagination, and observation
  • depict changes in body position
  • utilize fore, middle, and background in art work
  • use a palette for mixing tempera and watercolor
  • select appropriately sized brushes for specific needs
  • mix secondaries, neutrals, and skin tones
  • paint details over dry paint
  • create a subtractive sculpture using balsa wood
  • create a collagraph print
  • understand how to number an edition of prints

Aesthetics

  • evaluate own art work in terms of assigned specifications and personal satisfaction
  • describe art work in terms of subject, color, and detail
  • contribute art work as part of a group project
  • understand that repetition creates pattern
  • understand the importance of texture in art work
  • know that the appearance of an object changes according to viewpoint
  • know that qualities such as color, texture, and shape can express and symbolize feelings
  • understand the difference between additive and subtractive sculpture
Cultural Heritage


  • recognize common subjects, styles, and techniques of the arts from different cultures or ethnic groups
  • create original works that integrate characteristics from different cultures, including the student's own community

Art - Grades 4-5

The major goals for fourth- and fifth-grade students in Art are to:

Creative Expression

  • depict correct facial proportions
  • draw a human face in profile
  • utilize overlapping and diminishing size to indicate space and distance in 2D art
  • utilize basic pen and ink techniques
  • effectively include shadows and reflections in art work
  • mix intermediate colors
  • paint for emotional expression through the use of color, texture, and shape
  • create relief and free-standing sculpture using additive and subtractive methods with a variety of materials
  • safely use sharp carving tools in concert with a bench-hook
  • create a relief print using a rubber printing plate
  • create a subtractive sculpture using balsa wood

Aesthetics

  • analyze the more and less effective parts of his/her own art work
  • discuss the basis for his/her own preferences in art work
  • compare and contrast different works of art in terms of style, design, concepts, or mood
  • determine the light source in a work of art and explain how the light in an artwork affects the mood of the piece
  • understand the difference between relief and free-standing sculpture
  • understand the distinction between decorative and utilitarian art work

Cultural Heritage

  • recognize common subjects, styles, and techniques of the arts from different cultures or ethnic groups
  • create original works that integrate characteristics from different cultures, including the student's own community
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